Christian aTunde Adjuah
Christian Scott – Christian aTunde Adjuah
Christian aTunde Adjuah—(Christian Scott’s new name, and the aame of his new CD) continues to delve into uncharted jazz territory as the artist analyzes his African heritage, New Orleans ancestry, and present Harlem lifestyle on the two-disc set.  “The album cover is a self-portrait, a two-tiered depiction of me in the ceremonial regalia of the Afro-Native American Culture of New Orleans– colloquially known as Black Indians or Mardi Gras Indians. Christian’s band consists of guitarist Matthew Stevens, drummer Jamire Williams, bassist Kris Funn and pianist Lawrence Fields. Christian also recruited guests; tenor saxophonist Kenneth Whalum III, alto saxophonist Louis Fouche IIII, and trombonist Corey King.
“Fatima Aisha Rokero 400,” opens Disc One, where the trumpeter boldly soars over Stevens’ guitar and eerie muses. “New New Orleans (King Adjuah Stomp),” is a rhythmic bouncer about the resilience of post-Katrina New Orleans. He shines on his quiet, muted-trumpet as they perform  “Who They Wish I Was” about how people have equated his band with the classic Miles Davis Quintet of the ‘60s; the pounding “Pyrrhic Victory of aTunde Adjuah” is about the negative reactions of people to Scott’s name completion; while  “Kiel,” is a reflective musical portrait of Christian’s twin brother.
The second disc includes the catchy melody, guitar-growled, hopeful “The Berlin Patient (CCR5)”; the snappy-drum patterned “When Marissa Stands Her Ground”; the melodic tune “Liar Liar”; and the ballad “I Do” that Christian wrote to celebrate his engagement. “Cara” ends the album with its romantic beauty that spotlights his breathy trumpet lines over Fields’ rich piano comping. Overall, Christian aTunde Adjuah is a masterwork and places him among the best trumpeters and composers of his generation.
Christian aTunde Adjuah

Leave a Reply

JazzUSA Merchandise
BlackUSA History

Anna Ella Carroll Writer, civil-war strategist [...]

Prudence Crandall Pioneer Civil-Rights Educator [...]

The Pittsburgh Courier Early African American newspaper [...]

Anna Maria Weems Underground Railroad Slave [...]

John James Neimore Publisher [...]

Annie Onieta Plummer The Dictionary Lady [...]

Jonh Brown Abolitionist [...]

Liberia Established Freed American slaves established country of Liberia [...]

Briton Hammon First African American prose writer of note [...]

Matthias de Sousa Adventurer [...]

Andrew Young Named Ambassadoe and Chief US Delegate [...]

Milla Granson Helped make it possible for slaves to teach other slaves. [...]

Roland Burris, a longtime Illinois state official, was named to succeed former Senator and President [...]

Gus Savage ascended to Congress as an outsider to elective politics. A veteran civil rights activist [...]

The first African-American woman Senator, Carol Moseley-Braun was also only the second black Senator [...]